Helpful Tips

KEEP THESE THINGS IN MIND WHEN BROWSING THE GALLERIES

Dimensions for each piece of furniture can be found on the signboard in the photo. They are written as width x depth x height.
Many of the measurements on the signboards in the photos are expressed in centimeters. To convert to inches, divide by 2.54. We always round up to the nearest inch.

LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT THING?

When it comes to Chinese antique furniture, the perfect piece isn’t always obvious. For example if you are looking for a coffee table, you might consider coffers, kang tables, benches or trunks. Sometimes square dining tables can be shortened, particularly if the legs are badly damaged. These make lovely coffee tables for larger rooms.
Many people want to hide the television set when its not in use, and many of our cabinets are large enough to acommodate tvs, as well as other electronics.
The other big request is bedside tables or nightstands, which can be replaced by small Chinese chests, tea tables or book boxes.

CARE AND FEEDING OF YOUR CHINESE ANTIQUES

For the most part, this furniture is made of moisture loving wood. If you have a humidifier on your heating unit, it will benefit all of your pieces greatly to turn up the humidity level in your home.
For general cleaning and conditioning, we recommend beeswax. It removes buildup and leaves nothing behind to darken or thicken. It nourishes the wood and helps keep it hydrated. If there are scratches and nicks you need to correct, we always recommend a good quality paste wax. Quite often it has stain in it, which will color and cover these sorts of flaws.

IT MIGHT INTEREST YOU TO KNOW….

The finish on the furniture is not a petroleum product, but a natural plant product. Chinese “tree lacquer” is transparent and is hand rubbed onto the furniture, layer by layer. For painted pieces, each layer of lacquer is tinted. For example, cinnabar yields red lacquer and iron is used to make black. Many applications of tinted lacquer yields lovely vibrant colors.
All of this furniture is made by hand, using endless variations on the mortise and tenon joint. No nails or screws are used except in a decorative capacity or to attach the ornamental brasses.
When glue is used it is “hide glue”, made from animal hides. When the wood moves the hide glue bond will give way, and the wood is protected from damage. In China, our old furniture is usually taken apart to make sure the joints are sound. If there are problems, the damaged wood is excised and replaced, then re-joined.